Diamond Cut Alloy Wheels


Alloywheels.com
has a great range of diamond cut alloy wheels, but what exactly are they and how are they made?

The diamond cutting process, also commonly known as diamond polishing, is fairly similar to that of powder coating, except a machine cut finish is added to the wheel’s front face. This makes it extremely shiny (much like the back of a CD) and if you look closely there are lots of little lines across the surface that have been formed as a result of being turned on a lathe. To personalise the wheel, inserts can be painted and although black and silver are the most popular, any colour can be chosen.

Diamond Cut Alloy Wheels

A popular & desired finish

Diamond cut wheels have become increasingly popular over the years and more cars are now fitted with them, however powder coating offers greater durability for alloy refurbishment. Alloys can only be diamond cut a couple of times before safety is a real concern, as removing too many layers can seriously affect the integrity of the wheel and weaken it.

The finish can be applied to either the wheel’s full face or just the lip, depending on the effect you want to create. The incredibly smooth surface is perfect for repairing chips and dents; applying the lacquer to a polished surface involves a greater level of difficulty but allows for many different wheel finishes.

Diamond cut alloy wheel examples

Here are some of the stunning diamond cut alloy wheels alloywheels.com has to offer:

Project-A – Beta60 (Black Polished)

Project-A – Beta60 (Black Polished)

Project-A – Alpha85 (Silver)

Project-A – Alpha85 (Silver)

The diamond cutting process

To refurbish a wheel it is taken off a vehicle and then the tyre needs to be removed before blasting off any old layers of lacquer and paint. Preparation may involve chemically stripping in an acid bath if the wheel is in particularly poor condition. By gently heating the wheel, air is removed and an initial powder coat finish is then applied and cured, with a second coat being optional if a certain effect is desired. After being left to cool, the wheel is ready to go on the lathe where a thin layer of alloy is cut away. A clear lacquer is applied to prevent corrosion, the wheel is returned to the oven for the final curing stage and there you have it, one eye-catching diamond cut alloy wheel.

Choosing a particular base coat paint can give a really striking finish to the wheel. It is important to keep in mind though, that this precise process is not suitable for every type of alloy as it depends on the profile of the face.

Choose from a range of diamond cut alloys on alloywheels.com

Diamond Cut Alloy WheelsFor a high-shine, bare metal finish diamond cut alloys are the perfect option so visit alloywheels.com and order yours today!